Mine Shuttle Car Operators

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About the Job

Operate diesel or electric-powered shuttle car in underground mine to transport materials from working face to mine cars or conveyor.

It is also Called

  • Shuttle Operator
  • Shuttle Car Operator
  • Shuttle Buggy Operator
  • Ram Car Operator
  • Monitor Car Operator
  • Coal Hauler Operator
  • Cart Driver
  • Car Pincher
  • Car Dumper
  • Car Dropper
View All

What They Do

  • Maintain records of materials moved.
  • Read written instructions or confer with supervisors about schedules and materials to be moved.
  • Measure, weigh, or verify levels of rock, gravel, or other excavated material to prevent equipment overloads.
  • Monitor loading processes to ensure that materials are loaded according to specifications.
  • Direct other workers to move stakes, place blocks, position anchors or cables, or move materials.
  • Open and close bottom doors of cars to dump contents.
  • Observe hand signals, grade stakes, or other markings when operating machines.
  • Push or ride cars down slopes, or hook cars to cables and control cable drum brakes, to ease cars down inclines.
  • Guide and stop cars by switching, applying brakes, or placing scotches, or wooden wedges, between wheels and rails.
  • Move mine cars into position for loading and unloading, using pinchbars inserted under car wheels to position cars under loading spouts.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: R.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Relationships and Working Conditions in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Law and Government - Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.
  • Transportation - Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.
  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Operation and Control - Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Equipment Maintenance - Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

Education Required

These occupations usually require a high school diploma.

Wages

In 2017, the average annual wage in Pennsylvania was $64,210 with most people making between $54,000 and $78,980

Outlook

0.00%
avg. annual growth

During 2014, this occupation employed approximately 300 people in Pennsylvania. It is projected that there will be 280 employed in 2024.

This occupation will have about 0 openings due to growth and about 10 replacement openings for approximately 10 total annual openings.



Pennsylvania Department of Education