Telecommunications Line Installers and Repairers

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About the Job

Install and repair telecommunications cable, including fiber optics.

It is also Called

  • Wire Stretcher
  • Wire Splicer
  • Utility Technician
  • Utility Locator
  • Toll Patrolman
  • Toll Lineman
  • Toll Line Mechanic
  • Television Installer
  • Television Cable Installer
  • Telephone Technician (Phone Technician)
View All

What They Do

  • Dig holes for power poles, using power augers or shovels, set poles in place with cranes, and hoist poles upright, using winches.
  • Participate in the construction or removal of telecommunication towers or associated support structures.
  • Fill and tamp holes, using cement, earth, and tamping devices.
  • Use a variety of construction equipment to complete installations, such as digger derricks, trenchers, or cable plows.
  • Install equipment such as amplifiers or repeaters to maintain the strength of communications transmissions.
  • Compute impedance of wires from poles to houses to determine additional resistance needed for reducing signals to desired levels.
  • Place insulation over conductors or seal splices with moisture-proof covering.
  • Explain cable service to subscribers after installation and collect any installation fees that are due.
  • Dig trenches for underground wires or cables.
  • Pull cable through ducts by hand or with winches.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RE.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Enterprising environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Relationships and Independence in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Telecommunications - Knowledge of transmission, broadcasting, switching, control, and operation of telecommunications systems.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Coordination - Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.

Education Required

These occupations usually require a high school diploma.

Wages

In 2017, the average annual wage in Pennsylvania was $60,840 with most people making between $31,910 and $80,890

Outlook

0.07%
avg. annual growth

During 2014, this occupation employed approximately 7,630 people in Pennsylvania. It is projected that there will be 7,680 employed in 2024.

This occupation will have about 5 openings due to growth and about 135 replacement openings for approximately 140 total annual openings.



Pennsylvania Department of Education