Gaming Surveillance Officers and Gaming Investigators

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About the Job

Act as oversight and security agent for management and customers. Observe casino or casino hotel operation for irregular activities such as cheating or theft by either employees or patrons. May use one-way mirrors above the casino floor, cashier's cage, and from desk. Use of audio/video equipment is also common to observe operation of the business. Usually required to provide verbal and written reports of all violations and suspicious behavior to supervisor.

It is also Called

  • Video Surveillance Technician
  • Surveillance Technician
  • Surveillance System Monitor
  • Surveillance Supervisor
  • Surveillance Operator
  • Surveillance Officer
  • Surveillance Observer
  • Surveillance Monitor
  • Surveillance Manager
  • Surveillance Investigator
View All

What They Do

  • Supervise or train surveillance observers.
  • Act as oversight or security agents for management or customers.
  • Report all violations and suspicious behaviors to supervisors, verbally or in writing.
  • Observe casino or casino hotel operations for irregular activities, such as cheating or theft by employees or patrons, using audio and video equipment and one-way mirrors.
  • Monitor establishment activities to ensure adherence to all state gaming regulations and company policies and procedures.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RCE.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Conventional and Enterprising environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Independence and Achievement in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • Law and Government - Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Clerical - Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Social Perceptiveness - Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.

Education Required

These occupations usually require a high school diploma.

Wages

In 2016, the average annual wage in Pennsylvania was $37,250 with most people making between $23,910 and $54,120

Outlook

0.25%
avg. annual growth

During 2012, this occupation employed approximately 800 people in Pennsylvania. It is projected that there will be 820 employed in 2022.

This occupation will have about 2 openings due to growth and about 8 replacement openings for approximately 10 total annual openings.



Pennsylvania Department of Education