Transit and Railroad Police

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About the Job

Protect and police railroad and transit property, employees, or passengers.

It is also Called

  • Transportation Officer
  • Transit Specialist
  • Transit Police Officer
  • Transit Authority Police Officer
  • Track Watchman
  • Track Patrol
  • Secured Entrance Monitor
  • Railroad Watchman
  • Railroad Police Officer
  • Railroad Police
show all

What They Do

  • Seal empty boxcars by twisting nails in door hasps, using nail twisters.
  • Interview neighbors, associates, or former employers of job applicants to verify personal references or to obtain work history data.
  • Record and verify seal numbers from boxcars containing frequently pilfered items, such as cigarettes or liquor, to detect tampering.
  • Direct or coordinate the daily activities or training of security staff.
  • Plan or implement special safety or preventive programs, such as fire or accident prevention.
  • Provide training to the public or law enforcement personnel in railroad safety or security.
  • Enforce traffic laws regarding the transit system and reprimand individuals who violate them.
  • Examine credentials of unauthorized persons attempting to enter secured areas.
  • Investigate or direct investigations of freight theft, suspicious damage or loss of passengers' valuables, or other crimes on railroad property.
  • Patrol railroad yards, cars, stations, or other facilities to protect company property or shipments and to maintain order.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: CI.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Conventional interests, but also prefer Investigative environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Relationships, but also value Support and Independence in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • Law and Government - Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Transportation - Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Social Perceptiveness - Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.

Education Required

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.

Wages

In 2016, the average annual wage in Pennsylvania was $70,660 with most people making between $50,570 and $97,030

Outlook

0.00%
avg. annual growth

During 2014, this occupation employed approximately 120 people in Pennsylvania. It is projected that there will be 120 employed in 2024.

This occupation will have about 0 openings due to growth and about 0 replacement openings for approximately 0 total annual openings.



Pennsylvania Department of Education