Phlebotomists

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About the Job

Draw blood for tests, transfusions, donations, or research. May explain the procedure to patients and assist in the recovery of patients with adverse reactions.

It is also Called

  • Venipuncturist
  • Research Phlebotomist
  • Registered Phlebotomist-Part Time
  • Phlebotomy Technologist
  • Phlebotomy Technician
  • Phlebotomy Supervisor
  • Phlebotomy Services Technician
  • Phlebotomy Services Representative
  • Phlebotomy Program Coordinator
  • Phlebotomy Director
show all

What They Do

  • Serve refreshments to donors to ensure absorption of sugar into their systems.
  • Administer subcutaneous or intramuscular injects, in accordance with licensing restrictions.
  • Calibrate or maintain machines, such as those used for plasma collection.
  • Conduct hemoglobin tests to ensure donor iron levels are normal.
  • Perform saline flushes or dispense anticoagulant drugs, such as Heparin, through intravenous (IV) lines, in accordance with licensing restrictions and under the direction of a medical doctor.
  • Monitor blood or plasma donors during and after procedures to ensure health, safety, and comfort.
  • Determine donor suitability, according to interview results, vital signs, and medical history.
  • Draw blood from arteries, using arterial collection techniques.
  • Train other medical personnel in phlebotomy or laboratory techniques.
  • Conduct standards tests, such as blood alcohol, blood culture, oral glucose tolerance, glucose screening, blood smears, or peak and trough drug levels tests.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: IA.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Investigative interests, but also prefer Artistic environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Achievement and Relationships in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Clerical - Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Service Orientation - Actively looking for ways to help people.
  • Social Perceptiveness - Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

Education Required

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.

Wages

In 2016, the average annual wage in Pennsylvania was $34,130 with most people making between $25,450 and $46,310

Outlook

1.38%
avg. annual growth

During 2014, this occupation employed approximately 5,350 people in Pennsylvania. It is projected that there will be 6,090 employed in 2024.

This occupation will have about 74 openings due to growth and about 116 replacement openings for approximately 190 total annual openings.

Industries that Employ this Occupation

Industry breakdown is not available for this occupation



Pennsylvania Department of Education