Hearing Aid Specialists

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About the Job

Select and fit hearing aids for customers. Administer and interpret tests of hearing. Assess hearing instrument efficacy. Take ear impressions and prepare, design, and modify ear molds.

It is also Called

  • Senior Hearing Specialist, Audio Prosthologist
  • Newborn Hearing Screener
  • National Board Certified Hearing Instrument Specialist
  • Hearing Specialist
  • Hearing Screener
  • Hearing Instrument Specialist
  • Hearing Healthcare Practitioner
  • Hearing Health Technician
  • Hearing Consultant
  • Hearing Care Practitioner
View All

What They Do

  • Assist audiologists in performing aural procedures, such as real ear measurements, speech audiometry, auditory brainstem responses, electronystagmography, and cochlear implant mapping.
  • Diagnose and treat hearing or related disabilities under the direction of an audiologist.
  • Demonstrate assistive listening devices (ALDs) to clients.
  • Read current literature, talk with colleagues, and participate in professional organizations or conferences to keep abreast of developments in audiology.
  • Create or modify impressions for earmolds and hearing aid shells.
  • Train clients to use hearing aids or other augmentative communication devices.
  • Maintain or repair hearing aids or other communication devices.
  • Select and administer tests to evaluate hearing or related disabilities.
  • Administer basic hearing tests including air conduction, bone conduction, or speech audiometry tests.
  • Perform basic screening procedures, such as pure tone screening, otoacoustic screening, immittance screening, and screening of ear canal status using otoscope.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: ISR.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Investigative interests, but also prefer Social and Realistic environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Relationships, but also value Working Conditions and Achievement in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Sales and Marketing - Knowledge of principles and methods for showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.
  • Psychology - Knowledge of human behavior and performance; individual differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; psychological research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioral and affective disorders.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Service Orientation - Actively looking for ways to help people.
  • Instructing - Teaching others how to do something.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.

Education Required

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.

Wages

In 2016, the average annual wage in Pennsylvania was $55,560 with most people making between $28,330 and $90,860

Outlook

Pennsylvania projection information is not available

Industries that Employ this Occupation

Industry breakdown is not available for this occupation



Pennsylvania Department of Education