Veterinarians

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About the Job

Diagnose, treat, or research diseases and injuries of animals. Includes veterinarians who conduct research and development, inspect livestock, or care for pets and companion animals.

It is also Called

  • Zoo Veterinarian
  • Wildlife Veterinarian
  • Veterinary Virus Serum Inspector
  • Veterinary Toxicologist
  • Veterinary Surgeon
  • Veterinary Radiologist
  • Veterinary Physiologist
  • Veterinary Pharmacologist
  • Veterinary Pathologist
  • Veterinary Parasitologist
View All

What They Do

  • Inspect animal housing facilities to determine their cleanliness and adequacy.
  • Determine the effects of drug therapies, antibiotics, or new surgical techniques by testing them on animals.
  • Specialize in a particular type of treatment, such as dentistry, pathology, nutrition, surgery, microbiology, or internal medicine.
  • Direct the overall operations of animal hospitals, clinics, or mobile services to farms.
  • Drive mobile clinic vans to farms so that health problems can be treated or prevented.
  • Provide care to a wide range of animals or specialize in a particular species, such as horses or exotic birds.
  • Inspect and test horses, sheep, poultry, or other animals to detect the presence of communicable diseases.
  • Conduct postmortem studies and analyses to determine the causes of animals' deaths.
  • Perform administrative or business management tasks, such as scheduling appointments, accepting payments from clients, budgeting, or maintaining business records.
  • Plan or execute animal nutrition or reproduction programs.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: IR.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Investigative interests, but also prefer Realistic environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Achievement, but also value Independence and Recognition in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Medicine and Dentistry - Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.
  • Biology - Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Science - Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

Education Required

Most of these occupations require graduate school. For example, they may require a master's degree, and some require a Ph.D., M.D., or J.D. (law degree).

Wages

In 2017, the average annual wage in Pennsylvania was $106,420 with most people making between $47,430 and $160,340

Outlook

0.82%
avg. annual growth

During 2014, this occupation employed approximately 3,060 people in Pennsylvania. It is projected that there will be 3,310 employed in 2024.

This occupation will have about 25 openings due to growth and about 45 replacement openings for approximately 70 total annual openings.

Education & Training



Pennsylvania Department of Education