Radiologists

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About the Job

Examine and diagnose disorders and diseases using x-rays and radioactive materials. May treat patients.

It is also Called

  • Veterinary Radiologist
  • Vascular Radiologist
  • Therapeutic Radiologist
  • Teleradiologist
  • Staff Radiologist
  • Resident Physician in Radiology
  • Resident in Diagnostic Radiology
  • Radiology Resident
  • Radiologist, Chief of Breast Imaging
  • Radiologist Technologist/Mammographer/Densitometry
View All

What They Do

  • Conduct physical examinations to inform decisions about appropriate procedures.
  • Treat malignant internal or external growths by exposure to radiation from radiographs (x-rays), high energy sources, or natural or synthetic radioisotopes.
  • Develop treatment plans for radiology patients.
  • Serve as an offsite teleradiologist for facilities that do not have on-site radiologists.
  • Interpret images using computer-aided detection or diagnosis systems.
  • Administer or maintain conscious sedation during and after procedures.
  • Perform interventional procedures such as image-guided biopsy, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty, transhepatic biliary drainage, or nephrostomy catheter placement.
  • Participate in research projects involving radiology.
  • Provide advice on types or quantities of radiology equipment needed to maintain facilities.
  • Schedule examinations and assign radiologic personnel.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: IRS.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Investigative interests, but also prefer Realistic and Social environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Achievement, but also value Recognition and Support in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Medicine and Dentistry - Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.
  • Biology - Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Physics - Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.

Education Required

Most of these occupations require graduate school. For example, they may require a master's degree, and some require a Ph.D., M.D., or J.D. (law degree).

Wages

In 2017, the average annual wage in Pennsylvania was $187,170

Outlook

1.02%
avg. annual growth

During 2014, this occupation employed approximately 16,390 people in Pennsylvania. It is projected that there will be 18,060 employed in 2024.

This occupation will have about 167 openings due to growth and about 443 replacement openings for approximately 610 total annual openings.



Pennsylvania Department of Education