Set and Exhibit Designers

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About the Job

Design special exhibits and movie, television, and theater sets. May study scripts, confer with directors, and conduct research to determine appropriate architectural styles.

It is also Called

  • Theater Set Production Designer
  • Stage Set Designer
  • Show Design Supervisor
  • Set Designer
  • Set Decorator
  • Scenic Designer
  • Scenic Arts Supervisor
  • Room Designer
  • Production Designer
  • Presentation Specialist
View All

What They Do

  • Provide supportive materials for exhibits and displays, such as press kits and advertising, posters, brochures, catalogues, and invitations and publicity notices.
  • Incorporate security systems into exhibit layouts.
  • Arrange for outside contractors to construct exhibit structures.
  • Confer with conservators in order to determine how to handle an exhibit's environmental aspects, such as lighting, temperature, and humidity, so that objects will be protected and exhibits will be enhanced.
  • Design and produce displays and materials that can be used to decorate windows, interior displays, or event locations such as streets and fairgrounds.
  • Acquire, or arrange for acquisition of, specimens or graphics required to complete exhibits.
  • Coordinate the transportation of sets that are built off-site, and coordinate their setup at the site of use.
  • Coordinate the removal of sets, props, and exhibits after productions or events are complete.
  • Select and purchase lumber and hardware necessary for set construction.
  • Estimate set- or exhibit-related costs including materials, construction, and rental of props or locations.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: AR.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Artistic interests, but also prefer Realistic environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Achievement, but also value Independence and Working Conditions in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Design - Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
  • Fine Arts - Knowledge of the theory and techniques required to compose, produce, and perform works of music, dance, visual arts, drama, and sculpture.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Building and Construction - Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
  • History and Archeology - Knowledge of historical events and their causes, indicators, and effects on civilizations and cultures.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Coordination - Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
  • Operations Analysis - Analyzing needs and product requirements to create a design.
  • Time Management - Managing one's own time and the time of others.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.

Education Required

Most of these occupations require graduate school. For example, they may require a master's degree, and some require a Ph.D., M.D., or J.D. (law degree).

Wages

In 2017, the average annual wage in Pennsylvania was $47,890 with most people making between $26,070 and $70,390

Outlook

0.59%
avg. annual growth

During 2014, this occupation employed approximately 340 people in Pennsylvania. It is projected that there will be 360 employed in 2024.

This occupation will have about 2 openings due to growth and about 8 replacement openings for approximately 10 total annual openings.



Pennsylvania Department of Education