Geneticists

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About the Job

Research and study the inheritance of traits at the molecular, organism or population level. May evaluate or treat patients with genetic disorders.

It is also Called

  • Swine Genetics Researcher
  • Statistical Geneticist
  • Scientist
  • Research Scientist
  • Research Geneticist
  • Proteomics Scientist
  • Professor
  • Population Geneticist
  • Pharmacogeneticist
  • Pediatric Geneticist
View All

What They Do

  • Participate in the development of endangered species breeding programs or species survival plans.
  • Plan curatorial programs for species collections that include acquisition, distribution, maintenance, or regeneration.
  • Analyze determinants responsible for specific inherited traits, and devise methods for altering traits or producing new traits.
  • Design sampling plans or coordinate the field collection of samples such as tissue specimens.
  • Develop protocols to improve existing genetic techniques or to incorporate new diagnostic procedures.
  • Confer with information technology specialists to develop computer applications for genetic data analysis.
  • Design and maintain genetics computer databases.
  • Verify that cytogenetic, molecular genetic, and related equipment and instrumentation is maintained in working condition to ensure accuracy and quality of experimental results.
  • Conduct family medical studies to evaluate the genetic basis for traits or diseases.
  • Maintain laboratory safety programs and train personnel in laboratory safety techniques.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: IRA.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Investigative interests, but also prefer Realistic and Artistic environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Recognition, but also value Achievement and Independence in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Biology - Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Medicine and Dentistry - Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Science - Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

Education Required

Most of these occupations require graduate school. For example, they may require a master's degree, and some require a Ph.D., M.D., or J.D. (law degree).

Wages

In 2017, the average annual wage in Pennsylvania was $75,980 with most people making between $43,800 and $101,130

Outlook

0.00%
avg. annual growth

During 2014, this occupation employed approximately 760 people in Pennsylvania. It is projected that there will be 760 employed in 2024.

This occupation will have about 0 openings due to growth and about 20 replacement openings for approximately 20 total annual openings.



Pennsylvania Department of Education