Surveying Technicians

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About the Job

Adjust and operate surveying instruments, such as the theodolite and electronic distance-measuring equipment, and compile notes, make sketches and enter data into computers.

It is also Called

  • Transit Worker
  • Transit Survey Worker
  • Transit Man
  • Surveyor Rod Helper
  • Surveyor Instrument Assistant
  • Surveyor Helper
  • Surveyor Chain Helper
  • Surveying Technician
  • Surveying Crew Stake Runner
  • Surveying Crew Rodman
show all

What They Do

  • Perform manual labor, such as cutting brush for lines, carrying stakes, rebar, and other heavy items, and stacking rods.
  • Place and hold measuring tapes when electronic distance-measuring equipment is not used.
  • Provide assistance in the development of methods and procedures for conducting field surveys.
  • Perform calculations to determine earth curvature corrections, atmospheric impacts on measurements, traverse closures and adjustments, azimuths, level runs, and placement of markers.
  • Run rods for benches and cross-section elevations.
  • Direct and supervise work of subordinate members of surveying parties.
  • Lay out grids, and determine horizontal and vertical controls.
  • Maintain equipment and vehicles used by surveying crews.
  • Compare survey computations with applicable standards to determine adequacy of data.
  • Operate and manage land-information computer systems, performing tasks such as storing data, making inquiries, and producing plots and reports.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: I.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Investigative interests.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Relationships and Independence in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Engineering and Technology - Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Building and Construction - Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
  • Geography - Knowledge of principles and methods for describing the features of land, sea, and air masses, including their physical characteristics, locations, interrelationships, and distribution of plant, animal, and human life.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Mathematics - Using mathematics to solve problems.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.

Education Required

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.

Wages

In 2016, the average annual wage in Pennsylvania was $47,040 with most people making between $25,420 and $73,210

Outlook

0.29%
avg. annual growth

During 2014, this occupation employed approximately 1,740 people in Pennsylvania. It is projected that there will be 1,790 employed in 2024.

This occupation will have about 5 openings due to growth and about 25 replacement openings for approximately 30 total annual openings.



Pennsylvania Department of Education