Industrial Safety and Health Engineers

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About the Job

Plan, implement, and coordinate safety programs, requiring application of engineering principles and technology, to prevent or correct unsafe environmental working conditions.

It is also Called

  • Test Inspection Engineer
  • Security Engineer
  • Safety, Health, and Environmental Services Director
  • Safety, Health, and Environment Vice President
  • Safety Specialist
  • Safety Professional
  • Safety Manager
  • Safety Engineer
  • Safety Consultant
  • Safety and Risk Management Program Director
View All

What They Do

  • Design and build safety equipment.
  • Check floors of plants to ensure that they are strong enough to support heavy machinery.
  • Plan and conduct industrial hygiene research.
  • Compile, analyze, and interpret statistical data related to occupational illnesses and accidents.
  • Confer with medical professionals to assess health risks and to develop ways to manage health issues and concerns.
  • Write and revise safety regulations and codes.
  • Maintain liaisons with outside organizations, such as fire departments, mutual aid societies, and rescue teams, so that emergency responses can be facilitated.
  • Interpret safety regulations for others interested in industrial safety, such as safety engineers, labor representatives, and safety inspectors.
  • Provide technical advice and guidance to organizations on how to handle health-related problems and make needed changes.
  • Conduct or coordinate worker training in areas such as safety laws and regulations, hazardous condition monitoring, and use of safety equipment.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: ICR.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Investigative interests, but also prefer Conventional and Realistic environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Relationships, but also value Working Conditions and Achievement in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Engineering and Technology - Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • Chemistry - Knowledge of the chemical composition, structure, and properties of substances and of the chemical processes and transformations that they undergo. This includes uses of chemicals and their interactions, danger signs, production techniques, and disposal methods.
  • Physics - Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.

Education Required

Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor's degree, but some do not.

Wages

In 2017, the average annual wage in Pennsylvania was $100,610 with most people making between $60,480 and $149,200

Outlook

0.88%
avg. annual growth

During 2014, this occupation employed approximately 1,250 people in Pennsylvania. It is projected that there will be 1,360 employed in 2024.

This occupation will have about 11 openings due to growth and about 39 replacement openings for approximately 50 total annual openings.



Pennsylvania Department of Education